My Favourite Paradise

The smell of the sea and the sunlight playing in the waves.
White seabirds and ancient pines distorted by harsh weather.
An old murky house that immediately makes me think of smuggling raids and devious deals.
The old forest with shady winding paths, the moor and the burial mounds. A Paradise.

Dansk maler; Viggo Christian Frederik Vilhelm Pedersen
Udsigt over Tisvilde
Birth: 1854 Death: 1926

Dansk maler; P.C. Skovgaard
Udkanten af Tisvilde Hegn. Blæst
Birth: 1817 Death: 1875

The white mountains of Denmark

Møns Klint is an outstanding place.
It’s beautiful, dramatic and not without danger.
Weather changes are guilty of many landslides over the years.

Some of the latest landslides:

Sommerspiret, disappeared in 1988.

In 1994, a part of Dronningestolen slipped down to the sea. A French tourist was killed.

A huge landslide happened in 2007, when up to 500,000 cubic meters of chalk, clay and soil together with approx. 100 beech trees slipped 300 meters into the Baltic Sea.

Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg: View of Møns Klint and the Sommerspiret.
Danish: Udsigt af Møns Klint og Sommerspiret.
Danish painter, university teacher and visual artist.
Date of birth/death: 2 January 1783 – 22 July 1853.

Carsten Henrichsen: Summer’s Day at Møn’s Cliff
Danish painter.
Date of birth/death: 23 September 1824 – 30 April 1897.

P. C. Skovgaard: View of the sea from Møens Klint.
Danish: Udsigt over havet fra Møens Klint.
Date: 1850.
Danish painter.
Date of birth/death: 4 April 1817 – 13 April 1875.

Out in a boat

A person should go out on the water on a fine day to a small distance from a beautiful coast, if he would see Nature really smile. Never does she look so delightful, as when the sun is brightly reflected by the water, while the waves are gently rippling, and the prospect receives life and animation from the glancing transit of an occasional row-boat, and the quieter motion of a few small vessels. But the land must be well in sight; not only for its own sake, but because the immensity and awfulness of a mere sea-view would ill accord with the other parts of the glittering and joyous scene.

~ Augustus William Hare