Fairy Dust is Essential

The sun breaks through the clouds, and illuminates the bright golden birch trees.
Still, the impression is diffused. As if the colours are more important than the contours.
Has nature decided that today’s colours are the most important issue?
The blueberry rice is empty, but a few hidden blackberries are full of sweetness and memories of the summer’s bounteous harvest of luscious berries.
This place is fairy land. There is no doubt.

Fairy Dust is essential.

Where the bee sucks, there suck I:
In a cowslip’s bell I lie;
There I couch when owls do cry,
On the bat’s back I do fly
After summer merrily.
Merrily, merrily shall I live now
Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.
by William Shakespeare

Now is the time for wandering

Now is the time for wandering. Coolness in the air, vibrant colours and bird migration. Nature wears a new dress every day. Nature is exuberant at the moment.

These photos are from Rude Skov. A forest with great variety and bogs. It is highly recommended to stay on the trails, since not all bog holes have a water mirror. If one falls into such a hole, it might be very deep and with steep slopes which could make it impossible to save oneself without help from a person on solid ground.

Hvis I lader bilen stå hjemme, kører bus 354 fra Holte Station op igennem skoven mod Høsterkøb og videre til Nivå.
Rejse med tog og bus har den fordel, at vandreturen kan varieres i det uendelige.

Kort over Rude Skov

Rejseplanen for buskørsel fra Holte st. til Vildtfogedvej (Hørsholm Kongevej)

A Heartwarming Inspiration From Georgia

I went to the Botanical Garden in the middle of Copenhagen. I came to experience the quietness, the beautiful palm house and the exotic flowers. I ended up in a several hours long conversation with a stranger from Georgia, US.

There are no strangers here; Only friends you haven’t yet met.
– William Butler Yeats

The Botanical Garden is part of the Natural History Museum of Denmark, at the University of Copenhagen.

Natural History Museum of Denmark, Botanical Garden, Københavns Universitet

TO RETURN HOME
Thou­sands of tired, nerve-shaken, over-civilized peo­ple are begin­ning to find out that going to the moun­tains is going home; that wild­ness is a neces­sity; and that moun­tain parks and reser­va­tions are use­ful not only as foun­tains of tim­ber and irri­gat­ing rivers, but as foun­tains of life.
– John Muir, Our National Parks, 1901