HANNA'S WALK

Armies of light

I came across wonderful poetry by Daniel March written in 1869 and found it to be a religious text. That is not my reason for quoting the poetry, but because the description reminds me of the overwhelming joy it is, to walk in nature. When the clouds cast their shadows over hills and rivers, mountains and lakes in an ever-changing game.
The poetry of nature.

Clouds are among the most striking appearances in the natural world. Whether heralding the dawn with beacons of flame and banners of gold, or escorting the sun’s descending car with armies of light and sapphire thrones; whether clothing the mountains with garments of beauty, or enriching the landscape with flying shadows; whether shading the weary from the noonday heat, refreshing the field and the garden with gentle showers, or shaking the earth with mighty thunders; whether moving in silent and solitary grandeur along the blue deep of the sky, or covering the whole heavens with black and jagged masses, torn by the tempest and hurled onward like charging hosts in the shock of battle,—glorious in the morning, grateful at noonday, prophetic of the dawn at evening, clouds lend a charm to every landscape, a diversity to every season and a lesson to every thoughtful mind. No earthly scene could attract us long if deprived of light and shade from the changing clouds, and with our present feelings we should find it hard to be satisfied with heaven itself if it be one unvaried, cloudless noon. ~Daniel March, “The Balancings of the Clouds,” Our Father’s House, or the Unwritten Word, 1869

The Vikings’ secret defense in Roskilde Fjord

I will take you back to March 28, 2014, on a beautiful sunny day at Roskilde Fjord.
Roskilde Fjord is a beautiful area. I was born at the sea, but grew up in this fjord environment.
Always being near the water brought me many lovely experiences.
The fjord is idyllic, and you can plan many a good walk.
The history is exhilarating, and exceptional relics are left by the Vikings.
My walk starts at the ridge at Skuldelev. The silence is striking except for the song of the larch.
It is unusual to find silence today, but it is still possible here.

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You can see the Skuldelev Ås in the background.

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Skuldelev Ås is 5 kilometres south of Frederikssund, and is Denmark’s best preserved ridge. Most of the four kilometres ridge is publicly available.

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Out there in the fjord is the two islands Peberholmen and Kølholmen.
This is where they found the Skuldelev ships from the Viking Age.
Five ships were sailed out to block the entrance to Roskilde for enemy ships, as a part of a deliberate defence strategy.
The ships were filled with stones, and the only important task was that the ships were properly positioned when they sank.

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The Skuldelev Ship; The Sea Stallion from Glendalough was supposed to block the two major shipping lanes with its 27 meters. The ship could almost reach over both channels simultaneously.

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Here is the Sea Stallion under reconstruction at the Viking Ship Museum.

See the most beautiful photos from Sea Stallion’s many voyages.
The photos are taken by Werner Karrasch: Sea Stallion

Wish you a happy walk and leave no trace behind you unless they are of significant importance 😊

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