HANNA'S WALK

The Path of Gods

The Danish society for Nature Conservation stands behind the idea of The Path of Gods.
The inspiration came from a Danish author Martin A. Hansen, who wrote about a trail system about 64 kilometres long which goes from Mosede Fort to Vellerup Vig in Zealand, Denmark,
Martin A. Hansen did a thesis that ‘There has been a trade road, an army road and a path of Gods from Koege Bay to the Isefjord through wetlands, bogs, meadows, fields and forests.
Not just one for wheelbarrow or horseback riding, but a range of roads changing from century to millennium.
There are trails for the first burial mounds builders, the masters of the stone age monuments, there are the bronze age mounds, and finally the abode and grave grounds of the Iron Age and Viking age.’
# Lethrica, The Historical Associations in Lejre Municipality.
I had some very fascinating walks in an area enriched by history and great beauty. My walks continued over a year and became a beautiful journey in time and place.

‘Back in my drawers’ I found this video from some parts of the path of Gods.
Relax for four minutes and don’t expect wonders 🙂 apart from the music!

 

The domain Naturvandring-dk, is no longer mine!

Map to The Path of Gods

The Hour of Death

Leaves have their time to fall,
And flowers to wither at the north-wind’s breath,
And stars to set; but all,
Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O Death!
John Milton

Belief in our mortality, the sense that we are eventually going to crack up and be extinguished like the flame of a candle, I say, is a gloriously fine thing. It makes us sober; it makes us a little sad; and many of us it makes poetic. But above all, it makes it possible for us to make up our mind and arrange to live sensibly, truthfully and always with a sense of our own limitations. It gives us peace also, because true peace of mind comes from accepting the worst.
Deprived of immortality, the proposition of living becomes a simple proposition. It is this: that we human beings have a limited span of life to live on this earth, rarely more than seventy years, and that therefore we have to arrange our lives so that we may live as happily as we can under a given set of circumstances. … It made us therefore, cling to life─the life of the instinct and the life of senses─on the belief that, as we are all animals, we can be truly happy only when all our normal instincts are satisfied normally. This applies to the enjoyment of life in all its aspects.
A sad poetic touch is added to this intense love of life by the realization that this life we have is essentially mortal. For if this earthly existence is all we have, we must try the harder to enjoy it while it lasts. A vague hope of immortality detracts from our wholehearted enjoyment of this earthly existence.
Lin Yutang, The Importance of Living.

An inaccessible lake path

You don’t get very far with that pram. A young mother was fighting her way through a muddy forest floor among wild tree roots and even some of the minor slopes.
She looked at her smart phone. I saw a lake on the map, she said. A lake usually has a path. She was deeply frustrated. She had a wish to walk around the lake.
I told her about the neighbouring lake, Lyngby lake, whose path is much more suitable for a pram.
The path around Bagsvaerd lake is lovely but it isn’t suitable for prams all the way around because of a wonderful slightly impenetrable nature 🙂
I had a nice stroll from Frederiksdal to Sorgenfri. A wonderful varied walk.

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